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Essential power tools – the angle grinder

Welcome back to another “Tool Tuesday”.  Featuring prominently in the number three spot on our list of must have power tools is the angle grinder.

9" angle grinder and accessories

9″ angle grinder and accessories

The angle grinder is the power tool version of the hacksaw, the file and the wire brush all in one.  It is quite simply the most important tool to have in your shop if you are going to be working with metal (after the all purpose corded hand drill that was featured as the top must have tool of course).

There are multiple ways to join metal that are easy to accomplish including using pop rivets, metal screws and bolts – but before you start joining you need to have been able to form to shape and that means cutting and grinding and this is where the angle grinder shines.

You’ll want to pick up 1/8″ thick metal cutting disks, 1/4″ thick metal grinding disks and wire wheels (which make removing paint and rust a breeze).  If you are going to be cutting brick, concrete or tile you can pick up masonry cutting disks as well.

Now, you’ll find grinders come in a variety of sizes, from the 4 1/2″ models up to the beefier 9″ units.  While I have a smaller 5″ grinder my go to unit is a 9″ and it’s backup is a 7″.  For cutting and grinding disks I’ve pretty much standardized on 7″ diameter disks which I’ve found to be more common (and on sale more often) than the 9″ ones.  I also appreciate the extra power offered by the larger units.

That said,  the smaller ones are nice if you’ve got to work in tight spaces – such as under a vehicle or aren’t quite as comfortable with the heft and power of the larger ones.

Of course part of the process of determining what makes this list and where it ranks is price.  To give you an idea of the price these run between $20 and $65 at Harbor Freight as of now – without using one of their 20% off coupons they frequently circulate which would knock the price down to $16 to $52.

So if you don’t have an angle grinder yet pick one up today along with a selection of disks.

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English Muffin Rings – easy welding projects

Stainless steel strips cut with angle grinder

Stainless steel strips cut with angle grinder

English muffins are great and so easy to make.  While not necessary, if you want to have all of the English muffins come out the same size you need to use rings.

Now you can buy these.  I checked and there are a bunch on Amazon for $6 for 4 tin plated steel rings.  You’ll need three sets to take care of a batch of dough, bringing the total to about $20.  That’s not crazy,  but you can make them for close to free.

I had quite a bit of stainless steel pieces left over from making the wood fired pizza oven – the materials for that build of course coming from old BBQ’s.

Spot welding the rings

Spot welding the rings

Strips 1″ wide and 12″ long were marked out and cut out with an 1/8″ thick cutting disk on the angle grinder.

The strips were cleaned up with a file to smooth the edges and then cleaned with soapy water and stainless steel pot scrubbers.

These were hand formed into rounds with approximately 1/4″ overlap and then given two spot welds.  Now that worked very well for the thinner material 0.0200″ thick, but not the heavier material.

For the heavier segments, which were 0.0400″ thick the spot welder just wouldn’t cut it… which was a repeat of the performance I experienced when building the pizza oven.  For these I switched over to using the Henrob OA torch.

So for relatively little effort and very little expense I managed to save $20 and get some more metal working practice.

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Grain mill power drive improvement

I do a lot of baking, which means lots of flour – and since I grind nearly all of the flour I use (I do use commercial flour to cut my whole grain flours when I bake for friends) the homebuilt homestead grain mill gets a lot of use.  Now,  I regularly run through a loaf worth of grain by hand… but more often I grind up quantities of flour using the simple power drive.

Grain mill power drive powering through a few pounds of whole wheat

Grain mill power drive powering through a few pounds of whole wheat

It is a simple drive, a 1/4hp archaic electric motor whose speed is reduced (and torque increased) with pulleys and an intermediary pulley set on pillowblocks.  All of this setup is mounted to a wood frame that allows me to clamp the grain mill to the base.

The drive was put together using what I had on hand and has worked very nicely.   But, the belt on the grain mill was originally one that was pulled off of my snowblower when it became too worn to serve in that capacity.  Snowblower belts are heavy duty, but it was frankly very worn, and worn unevenly.  Still….it worked as the final drive belt for the mill for about a year.

But, by last week it was pretty clear that the life was pretty much gone from the belt, so this weekend I decided to get a new replacement belt.

Whole wheat flour off the burrs

Whole wheat flour off the burrs

I had been putting the grain through to pastry flour fine in three passes in order to keep the belt from slipping.  I started to adopt the same strategy when I finished swapping in the new belt, but,  change a variable and you change the outcome right.  In this case two things became apparent.  The overall pace at which I could process the grain could be boosted with the new belt, and rather significantly, which wasn’t unexpected since the new belt would have a much greater contact area with the pulley sheaves therefore transferring more torque to the grain mill.  But, something else changed too.    The old belt had been unevenly worn which introduced a bit of shaking, the new belt didn’t do that so the feed rate for the grain though the mill was reduced… so instead of three passes it now makes sense to grind to pastry flour fine in just two passes.  That reduces the necessary adjustment, which while quick and easy is still an extra step, so all in all a nice bonus and one that I hadn’t really counted on…. now to get baking…

 

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Goodell Cherry Pitter – First Try Pitting Bush Cherries

Now I really like my Goodell Bonanza apple peeler and corer.  It is fast and it does a great job.  It is probably the best hand cranked apple peeler out there – which is probably why they run a pretty penny.  I was lucky enough to get mine at a very attractive price at the stat of the last economic downturn and consider myself fortunate to have been able to take advantage of buying opportunities such as that one.

Ready to start processing the first harvest of bush cherries (that made it into the house)

Ready to start processing the first harvest of bush cherries (that made it into the house)

So when it came time to start shopping for cherry pitters to handle the cherries I was anticipating harvesting from my four bush cherries (Carmine Jewel,  Romeo, Juliette, Cupid) – those are the variety names in case you were wondering, I’m not generally in the habit of giving nicknames to my fruit trees – the Goodell Cherry Pitter stood out as one I though I would like to try.  I also noticed that it’s mechanical function has been copied in some more modern small commercial units – which spoke highly of its productivity and the lasting value of the operating principal.  After all, just because it can work doesn’t mean it will work well.

So with this the first real harvest year from my bushes and the harvest just started I got my first opportunity to give it a whirl.  I wanted to see if it worked as well as I thought it should, and if the pit holes might need to be bushed to accommodate the smaller bush cherries.

Two cherries pitted, impaled and about to be stripped from the prongs

Two cherries pitted, impaled and about to be stripped from the prongs

You can check out the video to see how it functions for yourself, but overall I am pretty satisfied.  Some of the pits were carried over along with the pitted cherries – so a few seconds of sorting was needed but overall the performance was pretty good, and I am fairly confident that I don’t need to machine and fit bushings into the pit holes.  The pits seem seem to be relatively similar in size to those in more common tree cherries even though the cherry itself is smaller.

So two thumbs up for the Goodell Cherry pitter.  Now I may still get a plunger unit just to see how those compare but for this season at least I am confident that I’ve got a fast and effective solution to processing what cherries make it inside for pies.  I’m pretty eager to make up a cherry cheesecake with my own cherries, and nearly as exicted to have a bunch of pitts to stratify and growout… maybe the next great bush cherry variety will originate from my backyard rather than the UofS… ahhhh aggie dreams.

 

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Essential Power Tools – The Circular Saw

Welcome to the second installment of our Tool Tuesdays.  Last week we revealed the top power tool in our books – the corded hand drill.  This week we follow it up with a tool that is nearly as indispensable and similarly as reasonably priced – the hand held circular saw.

There are loads of wood working projects around most homes – once you start to get comfortable with developing your own capacity to do and recognize that most of what you want done is within your grasp.  A good circular saw will address most of your wood working needs – at least as you are starting out.  It can cut dimensional lumber to length as well as rip sheet goods like plywood and chipboard.  Add a chalk line to your tool kit and you’ll be able to mark out cut lines on sheet goods with

The Circular Saw

The Circular Saw

ease.

It is also eminently portable.  Heading out to do some woodwork somewhere and this is your compact do it all tool.  Now, certainly I’m not knocking the chopsaw.  If you are laying hardwood flooring or putting up a good sized building a chopsaw is well worth the investment.  Likewise I love my jobsite craftsman tablesaw (count on it featuring in this list in a bit) but while both of them are “portable” they aren’t what I am going to grab for a quick project in the back yard or a job at the camp or a buddy’s.  That role, especially if I’m not completely sure what is going to be involved goes to the circular saw.  It’s easy to tote along, can do pretty much everything that the table saw or chop saw can do and if you are careful (read take your time) you can achieve results that are for most purposes close enough.

If you are wondering why my number two tool wasn’t more into the metal working sphere it’s because as much as I love metal working being able to do simple carpentry is going to find a lot more application for most if not all folks.

So if you are in the process of building up a workshop in order to become more self reliant and you don’t already have a circular saw add one to your list to pick up (new or used) and begin to figure out a few projects to exercise your kit and build your skills.

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The most important prepper / homesteader mechanical skill – oil changes

Yes, I am being dramatic.  Anytime you are presented with an absolute statement such as this you should approach it with caution.  But hear me out about why changing your oil is the most important mechanical skill for those who fashion themselves, preppers, modern homesteaders, or simply folks more interested in repatriating the skills they rely upon into their own households.

About to remove the oil drain pan bolt with the socket wrench

About to remove the oil drain pan bolt with the socket wrench

I don’t think anyone would disagree with me that we’ve become an increasingly less manually self sufficient society.  I think part of that is due to folks not needing to understand how to exercise those skills.  Some of that is because the things we depend upon are more reliable… there are fewer and fewer “shade tree” mechanics in part because it isn’t common to pull and engine and/or transmission to rebuild it.  Engines are much more reliable and so too are the individual systems, that is good.

The other part of the equation is that by and large we’ve enjoyed some pretty favorable economic times… which has allowed us to hire out work that a generation ago would have been done at home in order to preserve domestic finance as well as to replace instead of rebuilding.  Combine the improved reliability of systems which reduces the need to get our hands dirty together with the ability to hire out or replace and skill sets start to atrophy and disappear.

Oil filter styles - replaceable cartridge style on the left, spin on canister on the right

Oil filter styles – replaceable cartridge style on the left, spin on canister on the right

Still with me?  So why is the lowly oil change the most important skill for those seeking to build more self sufficiency into their lives?  Bear in mind that it was just last week that I was making up brake lines, and I’m the guy who thinks you should be building your own grain mills, tortilla and cider presses and smokers.

Simple.  Precisely because most folks are starting from a base of limited mechanical skills actually starting the journey is the most important part of the process.

The tools are limited – a good socket set, which is really pretty essential.  If you are hard up for cash a good enough socket set can be had for about $20 from harbor freight.

Supplies for an oil change

Supplies for an oil change

A good oil pan is under $10.  Now there are a couple of styles.  One looks like a jerry can with a bit of a depression in the the top and a removable drain plug as well as a big screw on spout at the top.  The other style is an open pan, usually with a couple of handles molded in and spout to allow you to drain it with some precision.  I’ve used both and I much prefer the open pan style, in part because there is so much less spillage since the oil doesn’t need to go into the container through a relatively small hole.  Especially when you’ve got a bigger vehicle the rate at which oil will pour out when you remove the plug can easily exceed the intake capacity of the jerry can style containers.

You should also grab a funnel which makes pouring the oil into the filler cap so much easier.  Now you’ll see that I have a comparatively massive funnel.  That is overkill for a normal passenger vehicle, but I use the same kit for my F250 Super Duty with the 7.3 liter diesel which instead of getting a fill-up of oil from a jug requires part of a 5 gallon pail, now that merits a big funnel, I simply use the same kit for all of my vehicles.

Vehicle ramps

Vehicle ramps

You may also need a set of vehicle ramps if your vehicle has relatively low clearance.  A set of ramps – which run under $40 – can raise up the vehicle and give you lots of clearance to slide under the vehicle.  Now if you want to be luxurious pick up a wheeled creeper but that certainly isn’t necessary.  Of all of the elements of changing your own oil I think the driving up the ramps is likely the most stressful part.  Just take it easy, apply enough gas to get you up but not so much to shoot over them… but if you do grab your jack used to change the tire and lift the car up and pull the ramp out, lower the car and do it again a bit more gently.

Finally, you’ll need to pick up the correct grade and quantity of oil and a new filter for your vehicle.  I favor conventional oil for the warmer months but will pay the premium for synthetic for the winter, where the lower viscosity really pays off.  If you don’t have a use for the waste oil you can put it in a container and return it to most garages.

If you want some guidance on the specifics pick up a repair manual for your vehicle or look on then net.

Payback for the tools will take about two oil changes and then you’ll be saving money – but more importantly, the payback in skills and confidence will come right away.  From there I know you’ll be more comfortable taking that incremental step forward to gaining more mechanical skills to empower your independence.

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When brakes brake fix em yourself.

Last weekend I was hauling a trailer load of garden-soil home to complete the planting of my fruit trees (for this year at least).  the truck would stop fine, but as I waited at a light the brake pedal would sink progressively to the floor.  The brakes were going…  I took it easy and made it home and slid under the truck.  Now it’s a 2001 F250 with the 7.3 diesel, so while components are beginning to rust the mechanicals seem to be in pretty good shape, and frankly I can’t justify or afford the replacement cost which would run over $50,000.

Brake line in the process of being removed.  The break in the line was a consequence of working to remove the line.

Brake line in the process of being removed. The break in the line was a consequence of working to remove the line.

So we fix it.  No big deal right, course mechanic time doesn’t come cheap.  So when I slid under it and saw the the brake line between the rear splitter and the left hand brake leaking I figured I would fix it myself.  Now, I’ve never replaced brake lines before, never bent brake lines.  I have replaced calipers and brake pads and bled the brakes… but with the great teacher – youtube – I got a crash course in how to bend brake lines – and how to form the double flange needed for the high pressure lines.

Tools to form the break lines

Tools to form the break lines

I ran up to the autoparts store and picked up the brake lines and fittings as well as the forming tools.  Total cost under a hundred bucks.  The old brakeline fittings were rusted but some penetrating oil – in this case my favorites are all lanolin (wool oil based) – and a bit of time saw them freed up.

I bent up a replacement segment to roughly the same shape and put it into place.  Now, came the time to bleed the brake system.

Here I hit a snag. The bleeder on the right side rear caliper was freed easily, but the one on the left side was stuck… really stuck.  I hit it with penetrating oil, let it rest, and tried it again.  When I had rounded the corners I ended up switching to vice grips… but still it wouldn’t budge.

Now, a replacement caliper runs in the order of $80, but replacing a perfectly good caliper solely because of a stuck bleeder screw is silly… now some folks will heat the screw with an oxy-acetylene torch and then cool it rapidly enabling it to be removed while on the vehicle… Since brake fluid is very flammable that isn’t such a great idea… Instead I removed the caliper and did this on a safe surface where if the torch lit the fluid on fire it wouldn’t take the vehicle with it.  It popped open in two seconds flat!  A replacement bleeder screw cost less than $3.  So it was quite a savings.

New brake bleeder screw installed salvaging the brake caliper

New brake bleeder screw installed salvaging the brake caliper

The caliper was reinstalled, the lines fitted securely and the system bled and the truck was back on the road.

Ok, so it took a couple of evenings to get everything pulled together and fixed up… but the total cost of the repair was less than $10.  Ten bucks!  The tools cost about $90, but now I have them… and with the rest of the lines at the same age I know I need to set aside a bunch of evenings to replace all of the remaining lines.

I know I saved a bunch of money over taking the truck into the garage for the fix, more than enough to pay for the tools – but more than that I gained the experience to be confident in doing the job.  It’s also a skill stepping stone. I know that it won’t be such a jump the next time some bigger fix comes along.  That is a pretty cool investment.  So the next time you face an auto repair job…  consider doing it yourself.

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The essential power tool – the corded hand drill

Welcome to “Tool Tuesdays”.  In an environment where everyone seems to have a top ten I thought I’d add my own – but since it’s tools we won’t be stopping at ten.

Without question I think the must have power tool – regardless of how much work you do – is the 3/8″ corded drill.  It’s really a slam dunk given how much use it is likely to find in anyone’s home, and how much effort it will save compared to doing the same job by hand.  At the same time a good unit is low cost – you are looking at less than $50 for a unit that should serve a home shop well for years – and on sale the price might fall to half that!

Now, what exactly do you need to accompany the drill to get the most out of it?

A twist drill bit set - note the reduced shank diameter on the 1/2" bit to fit the 3/8" drill chuck

A twist drill bit set – note the reduced shank diameter on the 1/2″ bit to fit the 3/8″ drill chuck

Well, for starters a set of regular twist drill bits.  Don’t go super discount here – they will just frustrate you.  You don’t need to buy pro grade bits but pretty good quality drill bit sets come on sale at attractive prices fairly frequently – pick one up.  Ideally you’ll be able to get a set with a range of sizes – which generally come with more of the small bits which break more frequently.  If you can only afford a set of bits with one of each size up to 3/8″ or 1/2″ (which if you have a 3/8″ drill will need to have a reduced diameter shank) get a package of 1/8″ drill bits which I find is the best all around pilot drill size.  Remember if you are drilling metal you’ll want to get a can of oil to lubricate and cool the bit while drilling.

A spade bit

A spade bit

Twist drill bits will go up to 1/2″ in a hand drill without issue – larger twist bits are available but those really need a drill press or specialized drill.  Rather if you are working with wood there are a few more styles of drill bit.  Up to nearly 2″ there are spade bits – these are simple and cheap.  If you are drilling where you might hit a nail these are the bits to use.  An added advantage are the extensions available for this style of bit – need to drill through a foot of wood – as needed to be done with the homestead cider press – and this is the bit for you.

If you are doing much finer quality wood work requiring larger holes you’ll probably want to get forstner bits.  These cut around the periphery of the hole and chip out the central section and don’t tend to rip out wood as much as you would with the spade bit.

A hole saw set

A hole saw set

Larger holes in metal or wood can be accomplished with a hole saw.  Instead of cutting out all of the materials as the preceding bits have these only cut out a thin strip around the radius of the cutter.  This is allows you to cut a much bigger hole using less energy.  If you are cutting metal choose a bi-metal set.

While we covered a whole bunch of bits you might not need anything beyond a set of twist drills.  But you will want a set of power driver bits – these are bits with screw heads.  These make putting in and removing screws easy.  Remember you may need to drill a pilot hole for the screw first depending upon what you are doing.  Get a bunch you will find that these tend to wear out, even the really good ones.  Bulk packs are reasonably priced – pick up a set and you’ll love using screws.

A set of power drive bits make installing and removing screws easy

A set of power drive bits make installing and removing screws easy

Finally, there are a bunch of tools that have a shank to fit into the drill chuck including wire brushes and shown here a buffing disk that was just used to polish the stainless steel on the homebuilt stainless wood pizza oven.

Why corded when cordless are available.  Well a few reasons – good cordless units that could compare with a corded one in terms of power are going to be expensive,  cheaper ones just don’t measure up for power or longevity of the batteries.  Plus these drills don’t use much power so you can easily use a light gauge long extension cord for a reasonable price.  As well, if you are going where you’ll only have your vehicle you can easily power these off of an inverter attached to your vehicle battery.

Hands  down you need at least one corded drill along with a twist drill bit set and driver bits in your home.

 

 

 

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Sweet Sorghum in Canada

Sweet Sorghum - Dale on the Left and Simon on the right.  Dale is 3 weeks ahead.

Sweet Sorghum – Dale on the Left and Simon on the right. Dale is 3 weeks ahead.

I’ve been growing varieties of sweet sorghum for more than 20 years.  Now sweet sorghum or even grain sorghum for that matter isn’t a typical crop for Canada let alone Eastern Ontario.

But, the description in the Peter’s Seeds and Research catalog for Northern Sugarcane tickled my fancy enough to order and trial it.  I should be honest and say that the threshold to tickle my aggie interest is pretty low – but this sounded like a really cool plant, and indeed it was.

It grew well, and later towards the end of that company’s life Tim Peter’s was kind enough to send me a sample of the John Coffer refined Dale variety in spite of it no longer being listed in his catalog.   I’ve since obtained a host of different varieties to trial including a number from the USDA ARS seed bank – which included some pretty cool varieties from India with high sucrose contents – which would allow regular crystalline sugar production and not only liquid syrup yield.    I also received a few varieties most graciously from Morris Bitzer from the University of Kentucky including Simon which is supposed to be 21 days earlier to harvest than the regular Dale variety.

Now, I’ve never had an issue having any of the varieties of sorghum I have tried reaching maturity save for a few varieties which are daylight sensitive and grew wonderfully but never headed out.  The successes include Dale, Sugar Drip, Mennonite, and a bunch of ARS varieties.  But,  given how much earlier Simon is supposed to be I wondered if a cross might be in order… not only to allow for a hedging of agronomic bets, but also in order to allow for a staggering of harvest dates for processing.  So I’m interested in trying a cross between my John Coffer Dale and Morris’s Simon.

Sweet Sorghum planted out

Sweet Sorghum planted out

Anyway,  this year I decided I wanted to boost my seed stock and plant enough that the syrup harvest wasn’t just sucking on the stalks.  So I started the seed in trays – the Dale three weeks ahead of the Simon in the hopes that i might be able to overlap their flowering period – and committed to building three 4’X8′ raised beds along the back hedge.  It’s not the best of spots, not receiving full sunlight but will have to do.

Those were completed this past weekend so I transplanted the sorghum along with a bunch of AC Sierra Sunflowers fronting the beds.  Now Sierra is a cool variety in itself.  It is an open pollinated dwarf oilseed sunflower that was bred to allow farmers to harvest the crop without needing special headers on their combines.  That lowering of the capital risk bar created markets for oilseed sunflower whose development led to a transition to more productive hybrid varieties.  But for smaller scale production, I still think open pollinated varieties where seed can be kept and evolved to better suit local conditions has a lot of allure.  but I digress.

Anyway,  this year my goal is to grow out a significant quantity of Dale and Simon seed, try my hand at making a cross and also build a small sorghum press.

The Little Wonder Sorghum Mill - Inspiration for the impending build

The Little Wonder Sorghum Mill – Inspiration for the impending build

Why build a press?  Well for starters sorghum syrup isn’t a typical Canadian product – that would be maple syrup – nor is it even a northern US product meaning a fairly long trip south would be necessary to get to where Sweet Sorghum was more common.  Don’t overlook the “was” in that last sentence either – sorghum mills aren’t like one of my letterpresses or machine tools which were common and still viable commercially into the 1970s, and hence are today “obsolete” but not yet rare, sorghum presses fell out of fashion long long ago.   Moreover, I’d really like to get the three roller horizontal units rather than a vertical roller one more suited to having the mule on the walking pole, and those especially the smaller ones that are still around appear to be in very high demand.

Fortunately I happen to have a whack load of metal working tools that are always eager to be put to work – funny how that function stacking works out eh?.  So much like with the homestead grain mill build it looks like I will be engineering a modern rendition of the small end of the commercial horizontal mills over the course of the summer.  With the sorghum in the ground I’ve got to get moving… (of course there are always a few projects vying for attention but the need to be ready for a harvest is a pretty good incentive to set a solid pace).  Stay tuned…

 

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Belshaw B doughnut dropper improvised stand

Belshaw B doughnut dropper in action

Belshaw B doughnut dropper in action

I’ve made yeast doughnuts for years now, ever since I left home and my mother’s prohibition on deep fat frying.  I’m still pretty cautious and tend to use the side burner on the BBQ when I want to do a fry-up.  That said I also keep a pot cover nearby and while some folks may have one or maybe at most two pipsqueak sized fire extinguishers I have a half dozen 20 pound CO2 extinguishers around the house including in the kitchen.  I haven’t had to use them, but it’s nice knowing that if I did have need for one that one is always close at hand and has serious knockdown power.

But I digress.  Yeast doughnuts are great and are easy to do with what you have around the home, and they were a frequent treat in my home. Then I started experimenting with cake donuts.  Now these have a different taste and texture from yeast donuts and are a breeze to mix up…. but I found making them to be a real mess.

See the batter is sticky, so trying to push it off a spoon with your finger (like you might with cookie dough) doesn’t work so well – and ensures you are covered with batter, and by the end of the process so too is much of the kitchen.  I then tried to extrude them using a jerky gun… That worked okish, but getting the batter loaded into the tube… well that was a mess.  Then I picked up a cheap “home” doughnut dropper… those are small, and low cost but I couldn’t get it to work really well, and loading the small hopper still created a mess…

Then my brother and sister in law gave me a copy of the Saveur magazine donut issue… and I decided to stop screwing around with half assed solutions to the problem and move up to commercial equipment where any issues had been addressed.

Doughnut hole production underway with no mess!

Doughnut hole production underway with no mess!

Now, the smallest pretty common donut dropper out there seems to be the Belshaw model B.  There is a slightly smaller version but that isn’t nearly as common.  Now, let’s not get you all exited that you are going to get pro gear at amateur prices… these units routinely sell for several hundred dollars – with the plungers alone going for over a hundred even when well used.  But I am a patient guy, so I set about watching e-bay for a Belshaw B to come up cheap… dinged and dented didn’t matter so much as the price.  I ended up being able to get one for a fraction of the usual price, complete with a doughnut hole plunger for about $150.

The first couple of times I used it I filled the hopper and held it with one hand over the pot of oil while cranking it with the other hand… not exactly the easiest balancing act.  But man,  was I hooked… it worked so well, and so quickly with so little mess.  I could instantly see why cake donuts are a commercial hit they are so easy and fast to produce when you are using commercial grade equipment.

Anyway, I needed a stand for it… I’ll get around to welding something nice up at some point,  but for now a couple of pieces of 2×6 from scrapped projects and a piece of 1/2″ steel rod assembled and clamped  in a folding work bench is all I really need.

It’s an interesting juxtaposition… high quality commercial doughnut dropper mounted on a 15 minute wood working project made with scrap, but in the assembly the quality is located where it needs to be – in the dropper, while the stand… well it just does its job.

So the next time you set about tackling a project under time constraints consider where and what quality level you need to achieve.  Now I could have made a great stand… but instead I’m making some great donuts!