Jun
26

By

Goodell Cherry Pitter – First Try Pitting Bush Cherries

Now I really like my Goodell Bonanza apple peeler and corer.  It is fast and it does a great job.  It is probably the best hand cranked apple peeler out there – which is probably why they run a pretty penny.  I was lucky enough to get mine at a very attractive price at the stat of the last economic downturn and consider myself fortunate to have been able to take advantage of buying opportunities such as that one.

Ready to start processing the first harvest of bush cherries (that made it into the house)

Ready to start processing the first harvest of bush cherries (that made it into the house)

So when it came time to start shopping for cherry pitters to handle the cherries I was anticipating harvesting from my four bush cherries (Carmine Jewel,  Romeo, Juliette, Cupid) – those are the variety names in case you were wondering, I’m not generally in the habit of giving nicknames to my fruit trees – the Goodell Cherry Pitter stood out as one I though I would like to try.  I also noticed that it’s mechanical function has been copied in some more modern small commercial units – which spoke highly of its productivity and the lasting value of the operating principal.  After all, just because it can work doesn’t mean it will work well.

So with this the first real harvest year from my bushes and the harvest just started I got my first opportunity to give it a whirl.  I wanted to see if it worked as well as I thought it should, and if the pit holes might need to be bushed to accommodate the smaller bush cherries.

Two cherries pitted, impaled and about to be stripped from the prongs

Two cherries pitted, impaled and about to be stripped from the prongs

You can check out the video to see how it functions for yourself, but overall I am pretty satisfied.  Some of the pits were carried over along with the pitted cherries – so a few seconds of sorting was needed but overall the performance was pretty good, and I am fairly confident that I don’t need to machine and fit bushings into the pit holes.  The pits seem seem to be relatively similar in size to those in more common tree cherries even though the cherry itself is smaller.

So two thumbs up for the Goodell Cherry pitter.  Now I may still get a plunger unit just to see how those compare but for this season at least I am confident that I’ve got a fast and effective solution to processing what cherries make it inside for pies.  I’m pretty eager to make up a cherry cheesecake with my own cherries, and nearly as exicted to have a bunch of pitts to stratify and growout… maybe the next great bush cherry variety will originate from my backyard rather than the UofS… ahhhh aggie dreams.

 

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