Jun
30

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English Muffin Rings – easy welding projects

Stainless steel strips cut with angle grinder

Stainless steel strips cut with angle grinder

English muffins are great and so easy to make.  While not necessary, if you want to have all of the English muffins come out the same size you need to use rings.

Now you can buy these.  I checked and there are a bunch on Amazon for $6 for 4 tin plated steel rings.  You’ll need three sets to take care of a batch of dough, bringing the total to about $20.  That’s not crazy,  but you can make them for close to free.

I had quite a bit of stainless steel pieces left over from making the wood fired pizza oven – the materials for that build of course coming from old BBQ’s.

Spot welding the rings

Spot welding the rings

Strips 1″ wide and 12″ long were marked out and cut out with an 1/8″ thick cutting disk on the angle grinder.

The strips were cleaned up with a file to smooth the edges and then cleaned with soapy water and stainless steel pot scrubbers.

These were hand formed into rounds with approximately 1/4″ overlap and then given two spot welds.  Now that worked very well for the thinner material 0.0200″ thick, but not the heavier material.

For the heavier segments, which were 0.0400″ thick the spot welder just wouldn’t cut it… which was a repeat of the performance I experienced when building the pizza oven.  For these I switched over to using the Henrob OA torch.

So for relatively little effort and very little expense I managed to save $20 and get some more metal working practice.

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Building the wood fired pizza oven – cutting and forming part II

We left off the wood fired pizza oven construction at the point of having finished the back of the inner shape.

Now, we have to produce the back of the outer shape and the front of the oven.  We’ll start with the back of the oven.  This is pretty much like the production of the back of the inner shape but the larger dimensions presented me with some issues.

Laying out back segment of the pizza oven across two pieces of stainless sheet

Laying out back segment of the pizza oven across two pieces of stainless sheet

The outer back segment is really much like the inner back segment – except that with the materials I had available to me I had to use two pieces.  So my first step was to trace out the outer curve from my template.

Marking out outer curve to provide for tabs

Marking out outer curve to provide for tabs

Then as we did previously we are going to mark out another curve 1″ outside of the curve you just traced from the template.

Cut along this line with a metal cutting jigsaw blade.  Once that is done,  you want to cut out the tabs.

Rear segment cut to shape - ready for the tabs to be cut.

Rear segment cut to shape – ready for the tabs to be cut.

For the back portion I didn’t bend over the tabs, preferring to wait until I had welded the two sides together into one piece.

The front piece is a bit different.  While the back inner and outer pieces will be joined only to the inner or outer curved segments respectfully, the front piece serves to link the inner to the outer curved pieces.

Not enough material to make the full curve with one or two pieces of sheet.

Not enough material to make the full curve with one or two pieces of sheet.

Somewhat like the back outer piece the front segment for me required three pieces to create the full segment.  So the first thing I did was trace out the inner and outer curve from the template.  Then you’ll need to mark out a 1″ line beyond each side of the curve and then cut along these lines.

First front segment clamped and ready for the tabs to be bent down.

First front segment clamped and ready for the tabs to be bent down.

Just as with the other segments you’ll need to mark out the tab segments and cut those with the angle grinder.  Unlike the back segment I bent over the tabs after having clamped the pieces to the pattern.

Middle segment showing overlap portions without tabs

Middle segment showing overlap portions without tabs

Now,  the third piece I needed to use to fill the gap between these two I followed the same practice, but trimmed the tabs off from the areas where the linking segment would be under the other two pieces.

With these done we’ve completed curved segments and are ready to move on to the next steps of the fabrication process including the roof segments that will go between the front and back pieces.

Front along with inner and outer back segments cut out and placed in relation to the fire brick

Front along with inner and outer back segments cut out and placed in relation to the fire brick